AGENDA

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2019 CvCC Europe Preliminary Agenda

 

Luke Manning

Head of Sustainability, Refinitiv – Formerly the financial/risk business of Thomson Reuters

 

As any Head of Sustainability or Chief Sustainability Officer will tell you, the most common question asked by fellow employees, clients, partners, family or friends is “What does sustainability mean to you?”

At Refinitiv, we launched a sustainable leadership agenda at the end of last year, looking at sustainability through two lenses: How we operate and how we measure our impact, and How we drive wider sustainable behavior beyond the boundaries of our own footprint.

We’re moving from a one dimensional to a three-dimensional risk rating view. This is a big step in the sustainable finance ecosystem and further reinforces the triple bottom line concept. Transparent data and consistent standards alone aren’t the answer – they’re the beginning of the process – but they can help underpin the necessary shift in behavior needed to solve the world’s environmental crisis. I believe there are two sides to sustainability:

1) How we operate and how we measure our impact.

 

2) How we drive wider sustainable behavior beyond the boundaries of our own footprint.

 

Both of the above can be on an individual basis, or as part of a collective.

 

When asked specifically about our professional roles as sustainability leads, that collective means the business we work for, or own.

 

At Refinitiv, we launched a sustainable leadership agenda at the end of last year, looking at sustainability through these two lenses.

 

For how we operate, we launched a number of environmental and social pledges, including reducing our annual carbon emissions by an average of 10% over the next five years, being powered by 100% renewable energy by 2020, committing to carbon neutrality in the same time-frame, and hitting our 40% women in leadership target. We also pledged to double our engagement with community investment programmes and recently signed up to the UN Global Compact, reaffirming our commitment to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

 

For impact beyond the boundaries of our business, we use our core data, risk and analytics expertise to drive wider impact, through empowering investors to shift towards sustainable finance initiatives. There is a major leadership gap in this space, and the current model is not delivering.

 

So what is sustainable finance?

Finance is the engine of our global economy and has a big part to play in tackling the environmental and social issues the world faces. The ultimate goal is transitioning to a low-carbon, resource-efficient, sustainable economy.

 

Sustainable finance is the provision of finance to investments which take into account environmental, social and governance (ESG) considerations, for the benefit of global societies. A simplistic view is it is the finance needed to progress the UN 2030 sustainable development goals agenda, and includes a range of products and initiatives, such as sustainable funds, green bonds, impact investing, micro-finance and active ownership.

 

Currently the EU estimates there is approximately a 180 billion Euro annual investment gap needed to drive the UN 2030 agenda and Paris climate agreement. This is one of the reasons Refinitiv has recently joined the United Nations Task Force on Digital Financing as a data partner. This task-force consists of leaders from a range of sectors from developed and developing countries, and is charged with harnessing the potential of financial technology to advance the UN SDGs – and ultimately close that investment gap.

 

Fundamentally, sustainable finance takes into account a triple bottom line; a framework including social and environmental impact alongside financial returns, as a true measure of success. It considers opportunity costs with an ESG lens, which is hard to measure and standardize.

 

The foundational pillars of sustainable finance are:

 

Policy and governance: Introducing regulation to re-orient capital towards sustainable investments, fostering transparency and disclosure, and mitigating sustainability-related risks in the financial systems.

Taxonomy: Establishing a common, dynamic standard for ESG investment activities.

Disclosures: enhancing corporate disclosures to enable the development of sustainable financial products, e.g. adoption of a green bond standard to enhance transparency.

Benchmarks: facilitating broader adoption and comparability in the market.

Refinitiv sits on the European Commission Technical Expert Group on Sustainable Finance, which is at the forefront of developing these core pillars.

 

Alongside the EU, China is also taking a lead here – the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), in collaboration with China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection, has introduced new requirements mandating all listed companies and bond issuers to disclose ESG risks associated with their operations by 2020.

 

Transparent, consistent, timely, actionable data and standards are crucial to all the above; they underpin sustainable finance. If finance is the engine for the global economy, data is the fuel – it helps de-risk sustainable initiative investments and encourages lending on the basis of well-defined projects, with sustainable supply chains.

 

Data drives clarity and clarity drives decisions; no data simply drives opinions.

 

ESG is now becoming a mainstream part of the data sets within the investment process, and credit rating agencies increasingly view risks through an ESG lens when they assess long-term outlook. Governance has traditionally featured in credit risk analysis but there are now new environmental and social factors being taken into account.

 

We’re moving from a one dimensional to a three-dimensional risk rating view. This is a big step in the sustainable finance ecosystem and further reinforces the triple bottom line concept.

 

Tackling the world’s environmental and social issues is the biggest challenge we all face and most organizations are not doing enough to shift how they operate, produce and consume. It needs collective action, from governments and global co-operation through to business practice and individual responsibility. Transparent data and consistent standards alone aren’t the answer – they’re the beginning of the process – but they can help underpin the necessary shift in behavior needed to solve the world’s environmental crisis.

 

To find out more about how Refinitiv’s suite of products can help corporations drive sustainable leadership, and investment firms meet sustainable investment mandates, go to refinitiv.com/sustainability.


Patrick Blankers,

Program Manager Sustainability, Europe, at Ericsson

The Role of 5G in Climate Action

Digital technology, especially 5G mobile broadband and IoT, will be key enablers for meeting the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals,

and in particular SDG#13, Climate Action. Digital technology can help tackle climate change and mitigate its impacts by optimizing value chains,

reducing resource usage/waste, sharing climate and real-time weather information, forecasting early warning systems, and supporting climate adaptation.

Ericsson approaches climate action by leading the way, and driving the exponential development of technology.

In 2018, Ericsson co-wrote the Exponential Climate Action Roadmap based on the understanding of the urgency for action, and that new technology will be fundamental to

reducing carbon emissions by half every decade. In this presentation, Ericsson will illustrate the role of 5G and IoT with various examples.


Thomas Lingard,

Global Director, Climate & Environment, Unilever

Climate Leadership for a Climate Emergency

Ambitious climate action requires both business leadership and supportive public policy.  Two month’s after the UN Secretary General’s Climate Summit in New York, and two weeks before the start of UN Climate Change COP25 in Santiago, this session will explore the actions that all businesses can take to demonstrate climate leadership as the true costs of climate change become increasingly clear.  It will consider advocacy as a critical role for business in the transition to a Net Zero emissions world and explore why engagement in international and domestic policy processes should be a core activity for all businesses serious about addressing climate change.


Uwe Bergmann,

Director, Sustainability Management, Henkel

Creating more value for our customers and consumers, for the communities we operate in, and for the company – while reducing our environmental footprint at the same time. This is the idea at the heart of our sustainability strategy and its related ambitious targets.

 

For a long time, growth and resource consumption seemed to go hand in hand and impossible to attain one without the other. Whenever population and living standards increased, it meant using up more and more of the earth’s resources. With expected population to grow to about nine billion people by the year 2050, this trend will not change anytime soon. Resource consumption will accelerate in the coming decades as natural resources such as fossil fuels or water are consumed much faster than the planet can keep producing them.

 

While these developments are challenges for the future, they also offer great potential: Innovating and achieving more with less will be a key to becoming sustainable. We need solutions that allow people to live a good life yet use less and less materials. This idea is at the heart of Henkel’s sustainability strategy, as we strive to find new ways of growing and improving quality of life without using up more resources. We want to improve our products and solutions through innovations and smart thinking – to create more value at a reduced ecological footprint.

 

Our contributions in six focal areas

We concentrate our activities along the value chain on six focal areas that reflect the challenges of sustainable development as they relate to our operations. Innovating and achieving more with less will be a key to a sustainable development that does not sacrifice people’s quality of life. To drive progress along the entire value chain through our products and technologies, we concentrate on a fixed set of areas that summarize the challenges as they relate to our operations. We have subdivided these focal areas into two dimensions: “more value” and “reduced footprint”. In order to successfully establish our strategy and reach our goals, both of these dimensions must be ever-present in the minds and day-to-day actions of our employees and mirrored in our business processes.

 

Achieving more with less

Our focal areas are divided into two dimensions: “more value” and “reduced footprint.” We aim to increase the value we create in the areas of “social progress”, “safety and health” and “performance”. In the areas “energy & climate”, “materials & waste” and “water & wastewater”, we aim to further reduce the resources we use and hence the ecological footprint of our operations and products


Sponsorships with Speaking Slots Available

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Ana Maria Rugarli

Sustainability Sr. Director EMEA, VF International

At VF, we’re climate optimists because we believe we can be part of the solution. It will take bold, concerted action to get there, but many of the technologies necessary to slow rising global temperatures exist today and the roadmap is clear. Inspired by the work of Professor Johan Rockstrom of the Stockholm Resilience Institute, we’re pursuing three climate work streams that will enable us to meet our goal of halving our carbon footprint by 2030:

 

Our Approach to Climate Change

 

Deep Decarbonization: If we are to achieve the progress outlined by climate science, between now and 2030 we must remove carbon from the global economy – also known as “deep decarbonization.” At VF, we’ve set a goal to power all our owned and operated facilities with 100 percent renewable energy by 2025. We’re setting science-based targets that put us on a path to decarbonize our value chain from the farms where our materials originate to the consumers’ front door. We’ll focus our effort where we have the highest impact and the greatest opportunity to drive change: increasing energy efficiency and shifting to renewable energy.

 

Natural Carbon Sinks: Our planet already knows how to manage carbon. In a normal functioning carbon cycle, forests, agriculture, oceans and soils keep carbon in balance by capturing and storing it in the atmosphere. Unfortunately, we are out of balance. That’s why we are investing in the creation and restoration of natural carbon sinks. Already we have a strong heritage of funding reforestation and conservation projects and working to conserve public lands and forests. And our Wrangler® brand is piloting cutting edge sustainable cotton practices aimed at transforming our cotton supply chains into carbon sinks. As we learn from our actions, we’ll scale best practices across the industry and with other agriculture sectors.

 

New Human Carbon Systems: Our approach to climate is inspired by the same commitment to innovation that fuels our business. We are always exploring new materials that drive quality and performance, and are in the early stages of exploring new innovative sources for those raw materials. This work is unlikely to contribute to our short-term emissions goals, but the long-term potential is compelling.


Virginia Covo,

Global Director, Sustainability Supply Chain at AB InBev

Mobilizing Supply Chains and the Importance of Such on Achieving Sustainability Goals


Andrew McMullen

Environmental Supply Chain Senior Manager at LEGO Group

To tackle environmental issues in our supply chain, we run the Engage-to-Reduce programme, which aims to lower the CO2 emissions outside our own operations. The programme has been running for three years and supports key suppliers. The LEGO Group takes our suppliers with us on our sustainability journey, and we work with them to introduce improvement measures that minimize their carbon output and ours.

 

Suppliers first need to map their CO2 emissions output to be able to reduce their footprint. We support our suppliers in this process by helping them report data through CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project), as well as identifying carbon reduction projects specific to their business. We also set up forums for knowledge sharing among their peers.

 

Carbon emission reductions are our first priority with our suppliers, and we plan to start working with them on reducing waste and water use too.


Michael Cooke

Chief Sustainability Officer, ABB

Sustainability at ABB

For ABB, sustainability is about balancing economic success, environmental stewardship and social progress to benefit all our stakeholders. Sustainability is part of ABB’s corporate strategy and business success.

 

Sustainability considerations cover how we design and manufacture products, what we offer customers, how we engage suppliers, how we assess risks and opportunities, and how we behave in the communities where we operate and towards one another, while striving to ensure the health, safety, and security of our employees, contractors and others affected by our activities.

 

Reducing energy, mitigating climate change

 

The link between energy efficiency, renewable energy and mitigating climate change is clear. In terms of ABB’s own operations, this means taking action to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions and to pursue low carbon forms of energy at our plants, offices and along the value chain.

 

As part of our Group-wide sustainability objective to progressively increase the efficiency of our own operations, we have set ourselves the target to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of our business by 40 percent by 2020 from a 2013 baseline.

 

The management of our worldwide real estate portfolio also plays a key role in ABB’s climate and energy performance. Our internal charter, The ABB Green Building Policy goes hand-in-hand with the Green Corporate Real Estate Management (Green CREM) strategy. This latter initiative, developed in Germany, is being implemented across Europe and in the US and will ultimately roll-out worldwide, safeguarding the global sustainability of our office sites and buildings.

 

We also seek to reduce the carbon intensity of our energy sources. Around the world, ABB operations increasingly choose to purchase certified “green” electricity and our facilities are installing on-site photovoltaic (PV) power plants to reduce environmental impacts and demonstrate ABB’s solar capabilities.

 

Other key areas of focus relate to our direct greenhouse gas emissions, which are mainly from fuel used in our operations as well as from SF6 emissions during production processes and gas handling on site. Elsewhere, programs to optimize logistics and packaging result in cost savings, improved quality and reduced emissions.


Joe Franses,

Vice-President, Sustainability at Coca-Cola European Partners

Joe Franses, VP of Sustainability at Coca-Cola European Partners, will discuss how CCEP is embedding its sustainability action plan across the entire business – supporting a shift to a low carbon economy; a circular economy where 100% of its packaging is collected, reused or recycled; and continually improving water stewardship.


Dr. Johanna Klewitz

Team Leader Sustainability, AUDI AG

Procurement Strategy

Decarbonization of the supply chain

Audi specific program for suppliers

Challenges/opportunities

Lessons learned so far

Next steps

2018 CvCC Europe Agenda

The 19-20 Nov, 2019 agenda is in development.

2018 CvCC Europe Preliminary Agenda

 

Michael Cooke,

Senior Vice President HSE and Sustainability at ABB

Big Impact with Technology Solutions

How can businesses make a real impact on climate change? Does short term thinking prevent action to prevent long term damage? What are we waiting for?

For ABB, sustainability is about balancing economic success, environmental stewardship and social progress to benefit all our stakeholders. Sustainability is part of ABB’s corporate strategy and business success.

Focus on one of our key pillars of the strategy: energy innovation. This would cover why reducing energy use and emissions is important to Vodafone and what the business case is.

Sustainability considerations cover how we design and manufacture products, what we offer customers, how we engage suppliers, how we assess risks and opportunities, and how we behave in the communities where we operate and towards one another, while striving to ensure the health, safety, and security of our employees, contractors and others affected by our activities.

Sponsorships with Speaking Slots Available

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Tom Salisbury

Senior Sustainable Business Manager at Vodafone

  • An overview of Vodafone’s Sustainable Business strategy and how it is integrated across the business
  • Focus on one of our key pillars of the strategy: energy innovation. This would cover why reducing energy use and emissions is important to Vodafone and what the business case is.
  • Discussion of our ‘2 for 1’ target through which we are helping our customers reduce their GHG emissions by two tonnes for every tonne of GHG we generate from our own operations. This would particularly focus on the potential of the Internet of Things to reduce emissions through smart meters, smart cities and improved logistics.

 

Kati Kaskeala

Corporate Communications and Sustainability Director, Southern Europe, Kellogg

Kellogg and Climate Smart Agriculture: growing our future together

The business of growing great food is interconnected – it relies on farmers, food manufacturers, customers, consumers and governments all working together. And making breakfast for millions of people in 180 countries relies on great ingredients grown by great farmers! That’s why, by 2025, Kellogg has agreed to support the livelihoods of half a million farmers around the world through partnerships, research and training on Climate Smart Agriculture, addressing both food security and climate challenges. Concretely, this means helping farmers adapt and be resilient to climate change, optimize the use of fertilizer inputs and estimate greenhouse gas emissions and measure continuous improvement.

A ground-breaking project focusing on this last element is currently being run in Spain, where Kellogg and its partners are working with local rice farmers to measure how much GHG are emitted from Mediterranean rice fields, and more importantly, what can be done to reduce these emissions. After all, we have all heard about cows releasing a lot of methane into the atmosphere, but did you know that rice fields actually account for nearly a quarter of the global methane emissions from agriculture? The good news is that, based on this new research, rice farmers in Spain can potentially reduce their methane emissions by up to 90% by putting into place alternate irrigation methods.

 

 


 

Andreas Foller

Sustainability Manager, Scania

“Today’s road transport systems are associated with air pollution, congestion, and GHG emissions. Scania has decided to take the lead in the shift towards sustainable transport. The company takes a holistic approach combining drivetrain and vehicle improvements, alternative fuels and electrification and services that help the customers to eliminate waste in their transport flows. During the session, you will hear about how Scania works with its customers and transport stakeholders to set up partnerships for change.”

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Romy Miltenburg

Manager CSR & Sustainability EMEA at ASICS Europe BV

Science-Based Targets at Asics: Energy Efficiency And Carbon Emissions

We have been measuring direct energy use and taking steps to improve energy efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions from our global business operations since 2011. In 2015, prior to the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21), we committed to set targets for CO2 emissions reduction based on the Science Based Targets (SBT) initiative.

SBT aims to encourage companies to pursue bolder carbon targets by helping them determine the level by which they must cut emissions to help prevent the worst impacts of climate change. Emissions reductions targets are considered science-based if they are aligned with the level of decarbonization required to keep global temperature increase below 2ºC, compared with pre-industrial temperatures.

Our 2020 target is to reduce by 5% absolute CO2 emissions from our direct operations (Scope 1 & 2, 2015 baseline), including retail operations. We aim to achieve the CO2 reduction target together with our business target to increase our sales by over 70% from 2015 to 2020.

In 2016, although we continued a number of specific energy efficiency projects, CO2 emissions increased 6.5% from the baseline year due to the significant increase in the number of our own retail stores from 444 to 867, almost doubling our number of retail locations. This is partly explained by the fact that our stores in Korea have changed from partnered stores (out of scope) toASICS-owned stores (in scope).


Carla Neefs

Director Supplier Sustainability

Signify

Andrew McMullen,

Renewable and Buildings Senior Manager, LEGO Group

Kate Redington

Supply Chain Account Manager at CDP

Engaging suppliers to tackle carbon emissions

Emissions located in the supply chain are on average four times as high as those from direct operations. CDP, a not-for-profit charity that runs the global disclosure system for investors, companies, cities, states and regions to manage their environmental impacts, will debate with Lego and Signify on the why and what of engaging suppliers. In this discussion, Kate Redington from CDP will speak with Andrew McMullen from Lego and Carla Neefs from Signify on their ambitions and the challenges they face to involve suppliers in active reduction of carbon emissions.


 

Axelle Bodoy

Global Milk CO2 – GHG manager at Danone

Targeting Zero Net Carbon Through Solutions Co-Created with Danone’s Ecosystems.

Being a food company means we rely on nature, agriculture and the farmers to do our job. Therefore climate change is a particular concern for us, especially since this has a significant impact on the natural cycles which play a vital role in the food system. It is in our interest and our responsibility to help fight climate change and contribute to achieving a decarbonized economy. This must start with reducing our own carbon footprint. We measure our impact including our full scope of emissions throughout the value chain, i.e. our direct and shared scopes of responsibility (meaning Danone’s related GHG emissions coming from raw materials and agriculture).

We can’t reach zero-net carbon within our full value cycle alone. Only by working together in partnership with our ecosystem of farmers, suppliers, customers and local communities we can make our vision a reality. Reaching our goal also means helping nature to sequestrate more carbon, tackling deforestation from our supply chain and managing all natural resources sustainably.

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Ian Knight,

Global Sustainability Senior Manager – MARS Inc

Mars’ goal is to decarbonise its value chain to deliver our share of the GhG reductions that the globe needs. This is a core element of our Sustainable in a Generation (SiG) plan which takes a science based approach to addressing climate change and other sustainability challenges that are most material to Mars. Mars is utilising renewable energy, improving factory energy efficiency and increasingly focusing on climate impacts associated with the agricultural part of our supply chain.  Ian will discuss the SIG plan, the impact of our renewable energy program on energy efficiency, the connection between energy and water efficiency, the challenge of renewable thermal energy and Mars is beginning to connect its brands with its environmental actions.”


 

Louise Koch

Corporate Sustainability Director, Dell EMC, Europe, Middle East & Africa

Digital Transformation Driving Climate Solutions.

For Dell, environmental responsibility is about incorporating sustainability into everything we do, while using our technology and expertise to innovate on behalf of our customers, our communities and the planet. Energy efficiency is a key innovation driver for product development in Dell. In 2012, Dell was the first in the IT industry to set a goal of reducing energy intensity across the entire product portfolio by 80% in 2020 – with a progress of 60% to date. This helps our customers do more with less, saving energy and cost in their operations.

With the digital transformation changing the way we live and work, new solutions like virtualization and internet of things hold an even greater potential to deliver resource efficiency and carbon solutions across business and society.

In this presentation, Louise Koch will share highlights from the innovation journey of energy efficiency in IT solutions and unfold the potential of how digital solutions are driving sustainability and the fight against climate change.


Carbon Accounting Panel

Moderator:

Arnaud Brohé, CEO, CO2LOGIC

Panelists:

Thibault d’Ursel, Global Head of Sustainability, BPost Group

Srđan RANDIĆ, Environmental Management Administrator, European Parliament

 

Carbon Accounting 2.0 – From a ‘nice to have’ to a ‘must have’. A conversation with sustainability managers from both public and private organizations. Recent trends show that carbon accounting is taking a more important role in management and continuous improvement strategies. This conversation will showcase real life examples of opportunities that have been seized and risk mitigation strategies that are being implemented by organization that calculate, reduce and disclose their carbon emissions in a world where emitting less carbon or offering products that are less carbon intense can become a key competitive advantage.

Sponsorships with Speaking Slots Available

For more info contact: jason@solveclimatechange.com

Carbon Accounting Panel

Moderator:

Arnaud Brohé, CEO, CO2LOGIC

Panelists:

Thibault d’Ursel, Global Head of Sustainability, BPost Group

Srđan RANDIĆ, Environmental Management Administrator, European Parliament

 

Carbon Accounting 2.0 – From a ‘nice to have’ to a ‘must have’. A conversation with sustainability managers from both public and private organizations. Recent trends show that carbon accounting is taking a more important role in management and continuous improvement strategies. This conversation will showcase real life examples of opportunities that have been seized and risk mitigation strategies that are being implemented by organization that calculate, reduce and disclose their carbon emissions in a world where emitting less carbon or offering products that are less carbon intense can become a key competitive advantage.


Stefan Bernards, Proposition Manager Light Controls – Nedap

Accelerating sustainability with connected systems

Sustainability initiatives do often not take place because of various reasons including financial budget constraints, internal competition for capital, innovation risks and project complexities and risks.

Servitization (in other words: turning products into services) is a trend that can help overcome these barriers. With the introduction of smart connected systems and management platforms will provide the data needed to successfully provide these services and truly unburden the market and help them to become more impactful.

Nedap Luxon is a connected lighting company mainly focusing on industrial and warehousing customers (think of Airbus, Hitachi, Costco, KLM etc.). In the lighting industry the concept of ‘lighting as a service’ is expected to have a profound impact on the speed with which sustainable lighting technologies will be adopted. Using real-life case studies and the results of a recent research project with a Dutch University, I can explore the role connected systems will play in accelerating the adoption of sustainable lighting in the market.

 


Moderator:

Tom Popple, Senior Manager, Climate Change & Sustainability, Natural Capital Partners 

Final speakers TBC

Pushing the Boundaries: Making Targets Deliver More

As companies come under increasing pressure to set emission reduction targets that align with science, how can they ensure they are delivering tangible business value? Three companies talk about how their programmes do more than just meet a % reduction each year: creating supply chain resilience, aligning with operational efficiency goals, or delivering reputational benefits.